When I visited Myanmar for the first time, it had been ruled by a corrupt military government, which secluded the country from the outside world for more that 50 years. Then I was transported to a forgotten era where a few aged cars ran on near empty streets lined by rows of dilapidated colonial buildings. The chug of aging generators could be heard as hotels and restaurants used them to augment the barely functioning electric grid. Yet, despite the dire economic condition in which the people found themselves, they beamed with happiness and smiles and shared a widespread, truly genuine appreciation and respect for life, each other, and foreign strangers such as me. It was a most beautiful and positive experience.

During these past few years Myanmar has transitioned from its seclusion and military rule into a “democracy”. The result of this transition is a very surreal and sudden flood of foreigners, foreign investments and 21st century products into a culture that had, essentially, been frozen in time. I recently returned to Myanmar and found the streets now overflowing with modern cars with a flood of new hotels being built at incredible speed. Despite this abrupt transition into modernism, the sincere, beautiful people remain unchanged from the first encounter I had within the country years ago.

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“Muhammad said no one looks back and regrets leaving this world. What’s regretted is how real we thought it was! How much we worried about phenomena and how little we considered what moves through form. ‘Why did I spend my life denying death? Death is the key to truth!’ When you hear lamenting like that, say, not out loud, but inwardly, ‘What moved you then still moves you, the same energy. But you understand perfectly now that you are not essentially a body, tissue, bone, brain, and muscle. Dissolve in this clear vision. Instead of looking down at the six feet of road immediately ahead, look up: see both worlds, the face of the king, the ocean shaping and carrying you along. You’ve heard descriptions of that sea. Now float, trust, enjoy the motion.’ ” -RUMI

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“La Neblina” is photographic journey along the Pan-American highway in northern Peru towards the high elevation city of San Pablo. In 1952 it was home to a leper colony that was visited by Ernesto “Che” Guevara.

The Faroe Islands are a maritime subarctic archipelago located in-between Iceland and Norway with a population nearing 50,000 humans and 70,000 sheep.

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A week in Gombolo, Kenya with the Norwegian aid organization Aid in Action. They focus on the basic needs for people in undeveloped countries such as clean water, nutritious food, safety, and care. Everyone involved in the organization is a volunteer and thus 100% of the donated money goes directly into development aid projects that include: drilling for wells, building water-infrastructure, building roads and children’s centers, buying greenhouses and food for the schools, and the planting of papaya trees. Aid in Action has managed to successfully use competitions with prizes to encourage farmers to plant papaya trees on their properties. Their ambitions are that the villagers will become self-sufficient and be able to continue without financial help from the organization by establishing their own economy. Below are the photographs taken of the beautiful people of Gombolo.

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Harbin is the tenth most populated city in China. Located above the 45°N latitude, the winters are bitterly cold and long. I traveled to Harbin in January, when the city was experiencing its coldest winter in 43 years. Temperatures in the day dropped below -34°C, and I was seriously unprepared. This experience completely transformed the meaning of the word “cold” to me. With every breath I took, the hairs in my nose would freeze, stab me from the inside and then defrost upon exhaling. Most of my film froze along with my cameras being covered always in a thin layer of ice. Life here requires 24-hour maintenance to keep the city moving — everything can and will freeze while cars struggle to run. There’s a constant and tireless mindset of maintenance and preparation that keeps this part of the world from being completely enveloped and lost in the winter. Although many people visit Harbin for its stunning yearly ice festival, I found the daily life to be much more spectacular.

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